Gates says he helped Manafort hide payments

  • Gates says he helped Manafort hide payments

Gates says he helped Manafort hide payments

Gates, who worked as Manafort's right-hand man for a decade, served as deputy chairman of the Trump campaign.

Check back for updates on this developing story and read Thursday's Arkansas Democrat-Gazette for full details. But Trump has shown interest in the proceedings, tweeting support for Manafort and suggesting he has been treated worse than gangster Al Capone. Prosecutors have pointed to an email in which Manafort sends to one bank a profit-and-loss statement his bookkeeper testified was inaccurate. He is also charged with bank fraud.

The 46-year-old former political consultant told jurors how Manafort asked for tickets to Trump's inauguration so he could give them to a banker involved in approving a loan at the center of his financial fraud trial. The income and the accounts, however, were not reported.

In one case, Magionos traced how foreign accounts were used by Manafort to pay for more than $3.5 million in home improvements. In a follow-up email, the company said: "She is no longer working here".

"I think Gates was a very poor witness".

The judge in Paul Manafort's financial fraud trial is joking about his efforts to speed up the prosecution's presentation of its case. They also need to prove he did so with intent and not by mistake. "Right now, it seems clear that it's the prosecution that should be specifically requesting that instruction from the judge in advance, as Judge Ellis has had some unusually cutting words for the prosecutors in this case".

He's also had several heated exchanges with the attorneys from special counsel Robert Mueller's office.

Manafort's defence team's has tried to pin much of the blame for financial crimes on Gates and raise doubts about his ethics and morals.

Prosecutor Greg Andres immediately objected and Downing did not return to the subject after a hushed consultation among the lawyers with Judge T.S. Ellis.

Defense attorney Kevin Downing asked whether Gates' "secret life" - four affairs over the course of five years - happened during the same time he embezzled funds from Manafort.

Before the final bang - or was it a whimper? - prosecutors had their own opportunity Wednesday morning to revisit with Gates exactly what he had done by way of financial crimes, and the steep, lifelong effect of prison time he could face if he told the jury inaccuracies about Manafort.

Gates said that Manafort asked him to meet with one of the Ukrainian businessmen involved in paying him millions of dollars to find out if one of the shell companies used to pay him was a "clean entity".

Still, that testimony has provided jurors with a damning account as Gates testified that he and Manafort knew they were committing crimes for years.

The drama came at the end of Gates's testimony in the trial of his former boss and mentor Manafort, an ex-Donald Trump campaign chairman accused of bank fraud and tax evasion.

Gates told the court in Alexandria, Virginia, that he had met with government lawyer Greg Andres and Federal Bureau of Investigation agents 20 times and been told only to tell the truth, without any guarantee that he will be spared prison.

While Gates and others have pleaded guilty, Manafort has refused to strike a deal and legal experts say he may be holding out hopes of a pardon from Trump.

The interview was part of an FBI investigation that sought to recover assets looted from the Ukrainian government under the rule of former President Viktor Yanukovych.

Downing summed up his questioning by asking Gates: "After all these lies, and the fraud you have committed, you expect this jury to believe you?"

Rick Gates leaves federal court in Washington, Feb. 23, 2018.

Gates testified that he had an extramarital affair a decade ago, and also that he embezzled hundreds of thousands of dollars from Manafort. He challenged the witness: "Have they [the special counsel's office] confronted you with so many lies you can't remember any of it?"