Man dies from bacterial infection after eating raw oysters in Florida

  • Man dies from bacterial infection after eating raw oysters in Florida

Man dies from bacterial infection after eating raw oysters in Florida

A 71 year old man has died due to contracting a bacterial infection after eating raw oysters at a restaurant in Florida, said the health officials.

According to WFLA News Channel 8, the health department said the man had some underlying medical issues. Since the beginning of year in Florida there were 16 cases of Vibrio vulnificus infection. One study conducted by the Florida state health office found the infection was the leading cause of death from foodborne illness between 1981 and 1992. The name of the restaurant was not released.

As per the Florida Health Department, the illness was caused as a result of the Vibrio vulnificus bacteria, which can be contracted due to eating raw shellfish, especially oysters or by exposing any of the open wounds to the seawater. Symptoms of the illness usually occur within 24 hours of ingestion and include watery diarrhea, abdominal cramping, vomiting, fever, and chills.

Because the water is warmer, bacteria become more prevalent. Officials say people can get infected by eating raw shellfish, particularly oysters, or by swimming in the ocean with open wounds.

"Infections are rare but exposures occur more commonly during the summer months from May to October, when the water is warmer", department officials said in an email reply.

This is the first confirmed case of the Vibrio bacteria this year in Sarasota, according to Florida Health.

Skin lesions caused by Vibrio vulnificus bacteria after Hurricane Katrina.

Anyone with a weak immune system is advised to wear sandals or flip flops when entering the water to lower the risk of getting cut or scraped by seashells. There were no reported cases past year, officials said. In 2016, there were 46 confirmed cases statewide and 10 fatalities.

In these instances, many people with the infections have to be admitted into ICU, with between 15 and 30 percent of cases proving to be fatal.