Mosquito Control: West Nile Virus detected, active in Butte County

  • Mosquito Control: West Nile Virus detected, active in Butte County

Mosquito Control: West Nile Virus detected, active in Butte County

West Nile virus is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. Most mosquito bites are harmless, and the worst thing about them is the incessant itchy feeling that accompanies the bite, but some are risky.

Past year was the most active season for West Nile since 2002, with one person testing positive for the virus in Oxford County.

Alberta saw seven cases of the virus previous year compared to the five seen in 2016 and between 2003 and 2017, a total of 514 cases were reported in the province.

The New Jersey Department of Health reported that there have been eight samples across five states that have tested positive, but that as of June 9 no reports of any human cases.

In addition to birds and humans, horses are also affected by West Nile virus.

"Weather permitting, the Health District's Residential Services Unit will fog in the area north to Condit Road, south to Hartford Road, west to Centerburg Road, and east to Meredith Road", a DGHD press release states. Most people who end up with West Nile get it from a mosquito bite.

Symptoms of the virus are often mild and may include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, a rash, muscle weakness or swollen lymph nodes.

In more severe cases, those infected can experience those symptoms in addition to coma, convulsions, vision loss, numbness, paralysis and more.

It can take weeks or months for a person to recover from a West Nile virus infection, according to the CDC.