Brexit CHAOS: Brexiteers vs Remainers - Tory rebels claim 'personal assurances' from May

  • Brexit CHAOS: Brexiteers vs Remainers - Tory rebels claim 'personal assurances' from May

Brexit CHAOS: Brexiteers vs Remainers - Tory rebels claim 'personal assurances' from May

It is not clear what the rebels may have been offered by the Whips behind closed doors to persuade them to toe the party line.

Rebels have said they will challenge May's plans to leave the customs union with the EU during votes on other bills that will be brought back to the house some time before July 24.

Under the proposal, if no deal has been reached with Brussels by this point, the government will return to the House of Commons to determine the next course of action.

Government sources signalled to the Press Association that ministers were set to back the move.

The former attorney general said: "The government agreed that the amendment raised an important issue, that the matter about the ability of Parliament to have a meaningful vote not just on the final deal but also on "no deal" had to be allowed".

In another chaotic day in Westminster, which saw the resignation of youth justice minister Phillip Lee in the morning, May spoke with around a dozen Tory rebels in her office minutes before voting started.

"In all conscience, I can not support the Government's decision to oppose this amendment because doing so breaches such fundamental principles of human rights and Parliamentary sovereignty".

One says: "If we do not get what we were promised the Government will be defeated after we have amended the Bill in the Lords".

It is thought that both the government and the Remainer group of Tory MPs consider the outcome to be a success.

The government says the changes would weaken Britain's negotiating position and is seeking to reverse them in the Commons. "We have no doubt of what was going on".

Meanwhile, Tory Brexiteer Bernard Jenkin told the government he would not accept ministers agreeing to Mr Grieve's demand for the House of Commons to assume control of Brexit negotiations in the event of no deal.

But her concession to parliament means that lawmakers now have more power if she fails to secure a Brexit deal, which may lead to a softer approach to Britain's divorce.

Labour's Shadow Brexit Secretary Keir Starmer believes that a Norway-style deal with the EU would not prevent a hard border in Northern Ireland and that becoming a member of the European Economic Area (EEA) - effectively keeping Britain in the EU single market - would be "totally incompatible" with the need to avoid a hard border with the Republic of Ireland, the Independent wrote. He said: "Facing the prospect of a humiliating defeat, Theresa May has been forced to enter negotiations with her backbenchers and offer a so-called concession".

The Prime Minister appeared to have defused a potentially explosive row over the EU customs union on Monday night as Tory pro-Europe rebels Sir Oliver Letwin and Nicky Morgan and Brexiteers Jacob Rees-Mogg and Sir Bill Cash came together to table a separate compromise amendment backing "a customs arrangement" with the EU.

"We will put in front of Parliament the decision for them to vote. after that there will be a process of primary legislation to put the actual details of it in Parliament, so Parliament will actually decide on the application of the detail".