Drug created to treat osteoporosis could be a cure for baldness

  • Drug created to treat osteoporosis could be a cure for baldness

Drug created to treat osteoporosis could be a cure for baldness

To see if the drug is effective, the team used follicles donated from 40 patients that had hair transplant surgery.

Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in NYC, said she feels hopeful that this research will result in a new medication and "bring us a step closer to finding permanent ways to help prevent hair loss and regrow hair".

They found that cyclosporine A quiets a certain protein (commonly known as SFRP1) that inhibits hair growth.

Scientific detective work led the Manchester team to test the osteoporosis drug's ability to stimulate hair growth.

Currently, there are only two FDA-approved drugs on the market for treatment of androgenetic alopecia, or pattern balding: minoxidil (for men and women) and finasteride (for men only).

The external application of WAY-316606 or similar compounds to balding human scalp may promote hair growth to the same magnitude as CsA or even better, but without its side effects, according to Hawkshaw. Both of these agents, however, only offer moderate side effects and are not universally effective.

"That said, more research will need to be done before it can be used by people with hair loss".

Originally created to treat osteoporosis, WAY-316606 was also found to target SFRP1 and enhance human hair growth.

"This makes our research clinically very relevant, as many hair research studies only use cell culture", Hawkshaw said. However, as CNBC note, hair growth was one of the few positive side effects of the drug, causing project leader Dr Nathan Hawkshaw to keep on looking for more options.

British researchers found that in the lab, an osteoporosis drug promoted the growth of hair follicles, but clinical trials will need to be done before it can be used on patients.

When they treated hair follicles with WAY-316606, the unrelated agent also effectively enhanced human hair growth like CsA.

In a study conducted on human hair follicles, researchers investigated a drug called Cyclosporine A (CsA), which has been prescribed to treat immune disorders and transplant rejection since the 1980s. The only other alternative open to individuals facing hair loss is transplantation process.